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Travel Insurance Bosnia and Herzegovina

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Bosnia and Herzegovina Country Guide

  1. CountryFacts
  2. Health
  3. Media
  1. Intro
  2. Geography
  3. People
  4. Travel
  5. Embassies & Visas
  6. Finance
  7. Cities/Regions

Quick Facts

Region: Europe
Full Name: Bosnia and Herzegovina
Capital City: Sarajevo
Language Spoken: Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian

Bosnia and Herzegovina Travel Insurance

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Geographic data

44 00 N, 18 00 E

Elevation Extremes

lowest point: Adriatic Sea 0 m highest point: Maglic 2,386 m

Land boundaries

total: 1,459 km border countries: Croatia 932 km, Montenegro 225 km, Serbia 302 km

Natural hazards

destructive earthquakes

Natural resources

coal, iron ore, bauxite, copper, lead, zinc, chromite, cobalt, manganese, nickel, clay, gypsum, salt, sand, forests, hydropower

Land use

arable land: 19.61% permanent crops: 1.89% other: 78.5% (2005)

Environmental current issues

air pollution from metallurgical plants; sites for disposing of urban waste are limited; water shortages and destruction of infrastructure because of the 1992-95 civil strife; deforestation

Climate

Dominated by mountainous and hilly terrain, and drained by major rivers to the north (Sava) and east (Drina), Bosnia & Herzegovina has a climate that is as variable as the rest of the former Yugoslav federation, with moderate continental climatic conditions generally the norm (very cold winters and hot summers). Required clothing In winter, heavyweight clothing and overcoat. In summer, lightweight clothing and raincoat required, with mediumweight clothing at times in the colder and wetter north, and at higher altitudes elsewhere.

Time difference

time difference: UTC+1 daylight saving time: +1hr, begins last Sunday in March; ends last Sunday in October

Population

4,498,976 (July 2006 est.)

Age structure

0-14 years: 15.5% (male 359,739/female 336,978) 15-64 years: 70.1% (male 1,590,923/female 1,564,665) 65 years and over: 14.4% (male 265,637/female 381,034) (2006 est.)

Median age

total: 38.4 years male: 37.2 years female: 39.5 years (2006 est.)

Population growth rate

1.35% (2006 est.)

Birth rate

8.77 births/1,000 population (2006 est.)

Death rate

8.27 deaths/1,000 population (2006 est.)

Net migration rate

13.01 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2006 est.)

Sex ratio

at birth: 1.07 male(s)/female under 15 years: 1.07 male(s)/female 15-64 years: 1.02 male(s)/female 65 years and over: 0.7 male(s)/female total population: 0.97 male(s)/female (2006 est.)

Life expectancy at birth

total population: 78 years male: 74.39 years female: 81.88 years (2006 est.)

Total fertility rate

1.22 children born/woman (2006 est.)

Business Practices

Business meetings in Bosnia tend to be formal and suites are normally worn. Titles and positions (e.g., "Ing." for Engineer) are highly regarded and routinely appear on business cards. Business people occasionally have difficulty in receiving replies to letter or fax correspondence. Often mail or faxes do not reach recipients in a timely manner. Business people are encouraged to follow up with correspondence to ensure contact with the intended recipients. As telecommunications standards remain well below those in the developed countries, calls or faxes may require repeated efforts.

Crime

Although street crime is relatively low and violent crimes are rare, petty street crimes such as pickpocketing and breaking into parked automobiles are problems. Travelers should take normal precautions to protect their property from theft and exercise common sense personal security measures such as avoiding travel in deserted areas after dark, walking in pairs, and staying in well-lighted areas after dark. The most serious problem affecting travelers to Bosnia and Herzegovina is armed, at times violent, carjacking, especially of four-wheel-drive vehicles. In carjacking situations victims should comply without resistance. Confrontations with local citizens resulting from traffic incidents or public disagreements should be avoided.

Hotels

There are a number of national and international hotels, particularly in Sarajevo and the major cities. Facilities in the smaller towns have improved in recent years and it is now possible to find hotels and other types of accommodation in most areas.

Communications

Country code: 387. Outgoing international code: 99. All telecommunications services, including facsimile, have been restored. This is also true of internal and international postal services.

Electricity

is a 220 volts AC, 50Hz. Electricity 220 volts AC, 50Hz. Two-pin plugs are in use.

Plug Types

C,F

Food And Dining

The traditional cuisine of the region includes obvious Turkish influences, with lots of meat dishes.

National specialties:
? Bosanski lonac (Bosnian meat and vegetable stew).
? Lokum (Turkish delight).
? Halva (crushed sesame seeds in honey).
? Cevapcici are sausages that are popular, as are hamburger-like patties called pleskavica, served with pita bread.
? Burek (filled pastries).
? Baklava is a popular dessert ? sweet nuts and honey in pastry. National drinks:
? Brandy is very popular, especially the homemade plum brandy called rakija.
? Turkish-style coffee and yogurt drinks are prevalent. Legal drinking age: 18.

Tipping:
Tipping is customary for taxis, as well as in hotels and restaurants; the bill is often rounded up.

Nightlife
Bosnia & Herzegovina's nightlife, particularly in Sarajevo, is widely reputed to be excellent. In the capital, the cosmopolitan atmosphere is tangible. The city apparently has more cafes per capita than any other European city and a relaxed cafe culture is prominent. There are many opportunities for nightlife activities, from cinemas and clubs to opera and theater performance. There are also frequent festivals, showcasing such popular pastimes as jazz and film.

Entry departure requirements

Visa immigration information

Passports

Valid passport required by all except:

(a) holders of valid National Identity Cards issued to nationals of Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain and Sweden;

(b) Nationals of Germany holding valid identity cards issued for minors called a Kinderausweis, with photo.

Restrictions

Bosnia & Herzegovina does not recognize passports issued by the Former Yugoslav Federation Republic (Serbia & Montenegro), which has a red cover.

Visas

Required by all except the following for a stay of up to 90 days:

(a) Nationals of countries referred to in the chart above;

(b) nationals of Andorra, Brunei, Croatia, Iceland, Korea (Rep), Kuwait, Liechtenstein, (Former Yugoslav Republic of) Macedonia, Malaysia, Monaco, New Zealand, Norway, Qatar, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia & Montenegro (not applicable for UNMIK passport holders), Switzerland, Turkey and Vatican City;

(c) Nationals continuing their journey to a third country by the same or first connecting aircraft, holding onward tickets, onward documents and not leaving the airport.

Types of visa and cost

Tourist, Business and Private: US$34 (single-entry); US$62 (multiple-entry for up to 90 days); US$77 (multiple-entry for more than 90 days).

Application to

Consulate (or Consular Section at Embassy); see Passport/Visa Information.

Application requirements
(a) Passport or official travel document valid for at least three months beyond the expiry date of the visa. (b) One completed application form. (c) Two passport-size photos. (d) Return/onward ticket. (e) Sufficient funds for duration of stay. Tourist: (a)-(e) and, (f) Copy of the invoice from tour operator. Private: (a)-(e) and, (f) Invitation letter from host, endorsed by the authorities. Business: (a)-(e) and, (f) Invitation letter from the host company in Bosnia & Herzegovina, endorsed by the Chamber of Commerce.
Note

Applicants from certain countries might have to submit evidence of cash assets (such as a recent bank statement), as well as evidence of a negative HIV test.

Working days required

Approximately three weeks, as all applications are now sent to Bosnia & Herzegovina for approval.

Temporary residence

Enquire at the Ministry of Interior in Bosnia & Herzegovina.

Passport/Visa Information

Embassy of Bosnia & Herzegovina in the UK

5-7 Lexham Gardens, London W8 5JJ, UK

Tel: (020) 7373 0867.

Opening hours: Mon-Fri 0900-1700; Mon-Fri 1000-1300 (consular section, personal callers).

Embassy of Bosnia & Herzegovina in the USA

2109 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20037, USA

Tel: (202) 337 1500 or 6473/6479 (consular section).

Website: www.bhembassy.org

Unexploded landmines remain a real danger and travellers should be careful not to stray from roads and paved areas. All public demonstrations or gatherings must be eschewed.

Visitors should also be aware of the global risk of indiscriminate international terrorist attacks, which could be against civilian targets, including places frequented by foreigners.

This advice is based on information provided by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in the UK. It is correct at time of publishing. As the situation can change rapidly, visitors are advised to contact the following organizations for the latest travel advice:

British Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Website: www.fco.gov.uk

HIV entry requirements

No Test Required

Departure tax

US$12. Transit passengers not leaving the airport transit area are exempt.

Embassies

Embassy of Bosnia & Herzegovina in the UK

5-7 Lexham Gardens, London W8 5JJ, UK
Tel: (020) 7373 0867.
Website: www.bhembassy.org
Opening hours: Mon-Fri 0900-1700; Mon-Fri 1000-1300 (consular section, personal callers).

Embassy of Bosnia & Herzegovina in the USA

2109 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20037, USA
Tel: (202) 337 1500 or 6473/6479 (consular section).
Website: www.bhembassy.org

Unexploded landmines remain a real danger and travelers should be careful not to stray from roads and paved areas. All public demonstrations or gatherings must be eschewed.
Visitors should also be aware of the global risk of indiscriminate international terrorist attacks, which could be against civilian targets, including places frequented by foreigners.
This advice is based on information provided by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in the UK. It is correct at time of publishing. As the situation can change rapidly, visitors are advised to contact the following organizations for the latest travel advice:

British Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Website: www.fco.gov.uk

US Department of State

Website: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel.html

Currency

Bosnia and Herzegovina Konvertibilna Marka (BAM) = 100 pfeninga. Notes are in denominations of BAM200, 100, 50, 20, 10, 5 and 1 and 50 pfenings. Coins are available in denominations of BAM2 and 1, and 50, 20 and 10 pfenings. Some Euro notes - but not coins - are widely accepted.

Currency restrictions

The import and export of local currency are limited to BAM200,000. There are no restrictions on the import and export of foreign currencies.

Banking hours

Mon-Fri 0800-1900.

Currency exchange

The Euro and US Dollar are the preferred foreign currencies. The Pound Sterling is of relatively little value in the republic and rarely used. Included in the Dayton Peace Agreement, signed in 1995, were provisions for a Central Bank of Bosnia and Herzegovina. This bank acts as a currency board and is the sole authority for the issue of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Konvertibilna Marka.

Credit cards

Credit cards are not generally accepted. Check with your credit or debit card company for details of merchant acceptability. ATMs are available in some cities (in Sarajevo and Mostar, for example), and their quantity is continually increasing. Cash is still generally advised.

Travellers cheques

Bosnia and Herzegovina is generally a cash-only economy and traveller's cheques are exchanged only at select banks.

City/RegionCity/Area codeFollowed by
Banja Luka(0)51+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Bijeljina(0)55+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Brcko(0)54+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Distrik Brcko(0)49+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Doboj(0)53+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Gorazde-Upper Drina(0)38+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Herzcg-Bosnia(0)34+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Herzegovina-Neretva(0)36+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Middle Bosnia(0)30+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Mrkonjic-Grad(0)50+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Posavina(0)31+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Prijedor(0)52+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Sarajevo(0)33+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Srbinje(0)58+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Srpsko Sarajevo(0)57+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Trebinje(0)59+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Tuzla-Podrinjc(0)35+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Una-Sana(0)37+ 6 digit subscriber nr
West Herzegovina(0)39+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Zenica-Doboj(0)32+ 6 digit subscriber nr
Zvornik(0)56+ 6 digit subscriber nr
  1. Health Information
  2. Recent Disease Outbreak
  3. Hospital Database

Dental care

Avoid dental treatment in Bosnia-Herzegovina as the standards of care and hygiene cannot be guaranteed.

Medication Availability

Supplies of international medications are not generally available in Bosnia-Herzegovina

Blood supplies

Blood supplies should be considered as unsafe in Bosnia-Herzegovina

Medical facilities

The lack of adequate medical facilities, especially outside Sarajevo, may cause problems for visitors. The blood supply is not screened for HIV or AIDS. Because many medicines are not obtainable, travelers should bring their own supply of prescription drugs and preventive medicines. Private medical practitioners are rare, but the number of private dentists is increasing.

General caution

Recent medical and dental exams should ensure that the traveler is in good health. Carry appropriate health and accident insurance documents and copies of any important medical records. Bring an adequate supply of all prescription and other medications as well as any necessary personal hygiene items, including a spare pair of eyeglasses or contact lenses if necessary. Drink only bottled beverages (including water) or beverages made with boiled water. Do not use ice cubes or eat raw seafood or rare meat. Eat well-cooked foods while they are still hot and fruits that can be peeled without contamination. Avoid roadside stands and street vendors. Only pasteurized dairy products should be consumed.

Specific concerns

Press reports indicate that the incidences of hepatitis, dysentery and other intestinal diseases have increased due to the lack of medicine and hygiene materials in hospitals and the breakdown of sanitation facilities in the war-torn area. AIDS occurs. Blood supply may not be adequately screened and/or single-use, disposable needles and syringes may be unavailable. When possible, travelers should defer medical treatment until reaching a facility where safety can be assured. Hikers should take protective measures against ticks.

Immunization

Hepatitis A: Consider active immunization with hepatitis A vaccine or passive immunization with immune globulin (IG) for all susceptible travelers. Especially consider choosing active immunization for persons planning to reside for a long period or for persons who take frequent short-term trips to risk areas. The importance of protection against hepatitis A increases as length of stay increases. It is particularly important for persons who will be living in or visiting rural areas, eating or drinking in settings of poor or uncertain sanitation, or who will have close contact with local persons (especially young children) in settings with poor sanitary conditions. Hepatitis B: Vaccination is advised for health care workers, persons anticipating direct contact with blood from or sexual contact with inhabitants, and persons planning extended stays of 6 months or greater (especially those who anticipate using local health care facilities, staying in rural areas, or having intimate contact with the local population). Polio: A one-time booster dose is recommended for travelers who have previously completed a standard course of polio immunization. Refer to CDC guidelines for vaccinating unimmunized or incompletely immunized persons. Pregnancy is a relative contraindication to vaccination; however, if protection is needed, either IPV or OPV may be used, depending on preference and time available. Typhoid: Vaccination should be considered for persons staying longer than 3 weeks, adventurous eaters, and those who will venture off the usual tourist routes into small cities, villages and rural areas. Importance of vaccination increases as access to reasonable medical care becomes limited. Contraindications depend on vaccine type. Note: All routine vaccines (such as DTP or Td, Hib, MMR, polio, varicella, influenza and pneumococcal) should be kept up-to-date as a matter of good health practice unrelated to travel.

Disease risk summary

Insect-borne illness: Encephalitis (tick-borne) - occurs Hemorrhagic fever - occurs Lyme disease - occurs Typhus (Murine and tick-borne) - occurs Food-borne and water-borne illness: bacillary dysentery and other diarrheas and typhoid fever are more common in the summer and autumn. Hepatitis occurs. Leptospirosis is endemic. Other hazards: Diseases such as measles and diphtheria are commonly reported. Polio is still considered a possible risk, although cases have rarely been reported in recent years. Influenza risk extends from November to April. Rabies - occurs in animals

Entry requirements

None

Recent disease outbreaks

No recent disease outbreaks

NameAddress
Klinicki Centar Univerziteta Sarajevo (Kosevo Hospital)Bolnicka 25 Sarajevo 71000
Opca Bolnica / General HospitalKranjceviceva br. 12 Sarajevo
University Children's HospitalBolnicka 25 Sarajevo 71000
University Clinical Center of TuzlaTuzla

Media

Since the war in Bosnia & Herzegovina, the media is no longer steeped in propaganda, but it is still only partially free, with journalists under pressure from state bodies and political parties to somewhat censor their content. This is thanks to the 1995 Dayton Peace Accord efforts, although this has had limited success. The most influential broadcasters are the public radio and TV stations operated by the Bosnian Muslim-Croat and Serb entities. A national public broadcasting service is now in development.
Press: The main newspaper for the Federation of Bosnia & Herzegovina, Dnevni avaz, is published in Sarajevo. Serbian newspapers include Nezavisne novine, published in Banja Luka. Dnevni list and the weekly Hratska rijec are Croatian-language papers, published in Banja Luka and Sarajevo, respectively.
TV: Public Broadcasting Service of Bosnia Herzegovina is a state-wide public broadcaster. Mezra and Open Broadcast Network are commercial broadcasters with near-national coverage. Federation TV operates two public networks within a Bosnia Muslim-Croat entity. Serf Republic Radio-TV is a public TV broadcaster of Bosnian Serb entity.
Radio: Public Broadcasting Service of Bosnia Herzegovina is a state-wide public broadcaster, operating BH Radio 1. Radio FBiH is a public radio service of Bosnian Muslim-Croat entity. Serf Republic Radio TV operates a public radio service of Bosnian Serb entity. Bosanska Radio Mreza is a private network, as are BM Radio (Zenica-based) and Radio Stari Grad (Sarajevo-based).

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