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Rescue Workers Sent in to Evacuate Area Hit by New Zealand Earthquake

Rescue workers have been sent in to evacuate the area hit by an earthquake in New Zealand.

The earthquake struck the town of Kaikoura, located on the east coast of New Zealand’s South Island, early on Monday morning.

The quake reached 7.5 on the Richter scale, killing a total of 2 people.

Hundreds of locals and tourists are being evacuated, and are taking shelter in evacuation shelters.

Rescue workers are continuing to rescue people who are trapped or stranded.

The disaster has been followed by hundreds of aftershocks, powerful winds, heavy rain, and landslides.

A tsunami warning was issued, yet later cancelled. The British FCO continue to warn British nationals in the area to “stay away from beaches in the affected area.”

The New Zealand Defence Force have stated that they have accepted help offered to them from Australia, Canada, Singapore, Japan, and the U.S. The help from international nations will assist the New Zealand Defence Force in providing aid to those affected by the quake.

The British FCO have updated their page, providing British nationals currently in New Zealand with advice: “Aftershocks are continuing following a 7.5 earthquake on New Zealand’s South Island in the early hours of Monday 14 November 2016 local time. A tsunami warning was issued. This has now been cancelled. However, you are still advised to stay away from beaches in the affected area.

“We advise British nationals in New Zealand to follow the advice of the local authorities.

“If a major earthquake or landslide occurs close to shore, you should follow the instructions of local authorities, bearing in mind that a tsunami could arrive within minutes.

“The New Zealand government is working to evacuate all tourists from Kaikoura, and we encourage British nationals in that area to follow any instructions given to them.

“If you're visiting remote areas of New Zealand, make sure your journey details are known to local authorities or friends/relatives before setting out. Weather conditions can quickly become treacherous, especially in winter.”